10 Movies That Are Hard To Recommend, Despite Their Great Quality

Posted 2018/02/03 2303 0

Because these films make their viewer have a negative emotional reaction to them. But they are still too good not to watch.

 

10. Grave of the Fireflies (Isao Takahata, 1988)

A devastating meditation on the human cost of war, this animated tale follows Seita (Tsutomu Tatsumi), a teenager charged with the care of his younger sister, Setsuko (Ayano Shiraishi), after an American firebombing during World War II separates the two children from their parents. Their tale of survival is as heartbreaking as it is true to life. The siblings rely completely on each other and struggle against all odds to stay together and stay alive.

 

9. The Beyond (Lucio Fulci, 1981)

Gruesome deaths occur when a woman (Katherine MacColl) inherits a hotel that is one of seven gateways to hell.

 

8. Dogtooth (Yorgos Lanthimos, 2009)

A controlling, manipulative father (Christos Stergioglou) locks his three adult offspring in a state of perpetual childhood by keeping them prisoner within the sprawling family compound. The children are bored to tears in spite of distractions like Christina (Anna Kalaitzidou), an employee of their father's who makes regular visits to sexually service the son (Hristos Passalis). Increasingly curious about the outside world, the older daughter (Aggeliki Papoulia) hatches a plan to escape.

 

7. Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008)

Life is looking pretty bleak for theater director Caden Cotard (Philip Seymour Hoffman). His wife and daughter have left him, his therapist is more interested in plugging her new book than helping him with his problems, and a strange disease is causing his body to shut down. Caden leaves his home in Schenectady, New York, and heads to New York City, where he gathers a cast of actors and tells them to live their lives within the constructs of a mock-up of the city.

 

6. Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012)

Retired music teachers Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant) and Anne (Emmanuelle Riva) have spent their lives devoted to their careers and to each other. Their relationship faces its greatest challenge when Anne suffers a debilitating stroke. Though Georges himself suffers from the aches and infirmities of old age, he bravely ignores his own discomfort to take care of his wife, and is determined to keep his promise to her that she never go back to the hospital.

 

5. Irreversible (Gaspar Noé, 2002)

A woman's (Monica Bellucci) lover (Vincent Cassel) and her former boyfriend (Albert Dupontel) take justice into their own hands after she becomes the victim of a rapist.

 

4. Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1977)

Henry (John Nance) resides alone in a bleak apartment surrounded by industrial gloom. When he discovers that an earlier fling with Mary X (Charlotte Stewart) left her pregnant, he marries the expectant mother and has her move in with him. Things take a decidedly strange turn when the couple's baby turns out to be a bizarre lizard-like creature that won't stop wailing. Other characters, including a disfigured lady who lives inside a radiator, inhabit the building and add to Henry's troubles.

 

3. Cannibal Holocaust (Ruggero Deodato, 1980)

A professor (Francesca Ciardi) finds the remains of a film crew in the Amazon and brings the camera footage back to America.

 

2. Nymphomaniac Vol. I and Vol. II (Lars von Trier, 2013)

A self-diagnosed nymphomaniac recounts her erotic experiences to the man who saved her after a beating.

 

1. Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1975)

In World War II Italy, four fascist libertines round up nine adolescent boys and girls and subject them to one hundred and twenty days of physical, mental and sexual torture.